The Language of Cinema


The cinema is arguably the most influential art form in today's world, but it is also the most misunderstood.  Many dismiss the movies as mere entertainment, while those who respond to films more thoughtfully often focus on devices and techniques culled from the novel or the stage play.  This series of screenings will introduce people to the formal audiovisual language of cinema and open their minds to the unique potential of film as an art form.  Each event will include a brief lecture and a viewing of a great movie, followed by a discussion of the film.  Through screenings and dialogue we will engage the grammar, logic, and rhetoric of this language, as well as respond to the experiences and ideas communicated by it.

Lessons and Films:

Upcoming

World Cinema: Rashomon (Akira Kurosawa, 1950)

February 27th, 6:00pm at the Brattle Theater in Harvard Square - Note: There will be a fee for tickets

Cinema as Language: Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

Saturday, March 3rd, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

Action as Art: Raiders of the Lost Ark (Steven Spielberg, 1980)

Saturday, March 24th, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

“Ecstatic Truth” – The Documentary as Art: Encounters at the End of the World (Werner Herzog, 2007)

Saturday, April 7th, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

Beyond Literature I: 8 ½ (Federico Fellini, 1963)

Saturday, April 21st, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

Beyond Literature II: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)

Saturday, May 5th, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

Beyond Literature III: The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)

Saturday, May 19th, 6:00pm at our office: 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, Suite G10

Past

Introduction: Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982)

October 30th at 7:00pm in Harvard's Leverett House (28 DeWolfe St, Cambridge, MA 02138)

Origins/Grammar: Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)

February 10 at 7:30 pm at our offices: Suite G10, 14 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA

Perhaps no film is more victim to its own titanic reputation than Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane. Long ago cemented at the top of Great Film lists around the world, Kane is often an object of distant, sanctimonious piety— but it is seldom engaged on its own terms.

At our next screening we will strip away the years of musty reverence and experience Citizen Kane with fresh eyes. Discover why Kane is the most influential film of all time. Be dazzled by its baroque art and bravura showmanship. And unravel the mystery of Charles Foster Kane, one of the biggest and most frightening personalities in movie history.

Program Director - Joseph Giallombardo

Joseph worked in Hollywood as a screenwriter  for various production companies, developing original content as well as assisting producers in executive decisions.  He has directed and produced several short films and written criticism on film, literature, and other arts.

Joseph loves to explore the way art inhabits and influences the every day life of a community, and he is passionate about introducing people to the unique potential of cinema as a formal language.  He is currently spearheading AAI's lecture series on great films and working for the Rose Institute in the Boston area.  He has a B.A. in History from the University of Dallas.